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MERMAID YOGA: CRESCENT LUNGE / HIGH LUNGE

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WITH LAURA GONZALES

Laura is a qualified Yoga teacher, read more about her in her profile.


 

CRESCENT LUNCH / HIGH LUNGE

Crescent Lunge is a stronger variation to Low Lunge (Anjaneyasana) which was the last yoga pose we featured.

HOW TO GET INTO THE POSE:

From Downward-Facing dog inhale and lift your right leg. As you exhale, gently step your right foot between your hands trying to get your ankle (heel) to line up under your knee and staying on the ball of the back foot (heel lifted).

As you inhale bring your torso upright and sweep your arms up so they come in line with your ears, palms turning in. Your back knee can be slightly bent to start but you are working towards eventually having a straight back leg.

Send lots of energy out of your back heel and energetically scissor your inner thighs in towards each other so that rather than sinking into the front heel you are drawing up through both legs.

Find a slight tuck of the tailbone (think of lengthening it towards the floor) so that your spine can lengthen and you aren’t arching excessively in the low back. Engage through your core and draw the low ribs in (this will also help eliminate arching in the low back).

Relax your shoulders down your back but feel energy traveling up the arms and out through your fingers.  Hold for a single breath if flowing or several breaths.

When you are ready to come out of the pose, exhale to lengthen the torso over your front thigh as you release your hands back to frame your front foot. Step the right foot back and press back into downward facing dog.

Repeat on the left side.

BENEFITS:

Like Low Lunge, Cresent Lunge stretches hip flexors and quadriceps as discussed last week. It also works to strengthen legs whilst improving balance, coordination, and focus. To modify (make easier) refer to low lunge in previous feature.


DISCLAIMER * Please be advised that The Mermaid Society provides Yoga poses as a story of interest. Should you chose to try a pose or activity you do so at your own risk and The Mermaid Society takes no responsibility for injury sustained by or from you participating in the activity. If you are not sure whether you should participate in an activity please check with your local General Practitioner GP. 

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